Effect Of Anabolic Steroids On Muscles

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  • Steroids And Their Harmful Side Effects
  • What Are Anabolic Steroids And How Do They Work? | MomsTeam
  • Performance-enhancing drugs: Know the risks - Mayo Clinic
  • Steroids And Their Harmful Side Effects | Muscle & Strength
  • Anabolic steroids: Use, side effects, and risks
  • Juiced Up - The Consequences of Steroids: SWOLE Ep. 3

    Steroids And Their Harmful Side Effects

    effect of anabolic steroids on muscles Some steroids can be incredibly harmful to those who take them. Conversely, some types are used to help people with inflammatory conditions like chronic bronchitis, but those are categorized as corticosteroids. They are not the same as the more harmful version: Anabolic steroids —sometimes referred to as "juice" or "roids"—are actually synthetic forms of muscularity steroids male hormone, testosterone. It may be used legitimately to induce puberty or to help those suffering from wasting diseases like AIDS or cancers. Technically, this group of substances is called anabolic-androgenic steroids AAS. Effect of anabolic steroids on muscles users of anabolic steroids include:.

    What Are Anabolic Steroids And How Do They Work? | MomsTeam

    effect of anabolic steroids on muscles

    Are you hoping to gain a competitive edge by taking muscle-building supplements or other performance-enhancing drugs? Learn how these drugs work and how they can affect your health. Most serious athletes will tell you that the competitive drive to win can be fierce. Besides the satisfaction of personal accomplishment, athletes often pursue dreams of winning a medal for their country or securing a spot on a professional team.

    In such an environment, the use of performance-enhancing drugs has become increasingly common. But using performance-enhancing drugs — aka, doping — isn't without risks. Take the time to learn about the potential benefits, the health risks and the many unknowns regarding so-called performance-enhancing drugs such as anabolic steroids, androstenedione, human growth hormone, erythropoietin, diuretics, creatine and stimulants.

    You may decide that the benefits aren't worth the risks. Some athletes take a form of steroids — known as anabolic-androgen steroids or just anabolic steroids — to increase their muscle mass and strength. The main anabolic steroid hormone produced by your body is testosterone. Some athletes take straight testosterone to boost their performance. Frequently, the anabolic steroids that athletes use are synthetic modifications of testosterone.

    These hormones have approved medical uses, though improving athletic performance is not one of them. They can be taken as pills, injections or topical treatments. Why are these drugs so appealing to athletes? Besides making muscles bigger, anabolic steroids may help athletes recover from a hard workout more quickly by reducing the muscle damage that occurs during the session. This enables athletes to work out harder and more frequently without overtraining. In addition, some athletes may like the aggressive feelings they get when they take the drugs.

    A particularly dangerous class of anabolic steroids are the so-called designer drugs — synthetic steroids that have been illicitly created to be undetectable by current drug tests. They are made specifically for athletes and have no approved medical use.

    Because of this, they haven't been tested or approved by the Food and Drug Administration FDA and represent a particular health threat to athletes. Many athletes take anabolic steroids at doses that are much higher than those prescribed for medical reasons, and most of what is known about the drugs' effects on athletes comes from observing users.

    It is impossible for researchers to design studies that would accurately test the effects of large doses of steroids on athletes, because giving participants such high doses would be unethical. This means that the effects of taking anabolic steroids at very high doses haven't been well-studied. Taking anabolic-androgenic steroids to enhance athletic performance, besides being prohibited by most sports organizations, is illegal. In the past 20 years, more effective law enforcement in the United States has pushed much of the illegal steroid industry into the black market.

    This poses additional health risks because the drugs are either made in other countries and smuggled in or made in clandestine labs in the United States. Either way, they aren't subject to government safety standards and could be impure or mislabeled. Androstenedione andro is a hormone produced by the adrenal glands, ovaries and testes.

    It's a hormone that's normally converted to testosterone and estradiol in both men and women. Andro is available legally only in prescription form and is a controlled substance. Manufacturers and bodybuilding magazines tout its ability to allow athletes to train harder and recover more quickly.

    However, its use as a performance-enhancing drug is illegal in the United States. Scientific studies that refute these claims show that supplemental androstenedione doesn't increase testosterone and that your muscles don't get stronger with andro use.

    In both men and women, andro can decrease HDL cholesterol the "good" cholesterol , which puts you at greater risk of heart attack and stroke. Human growth hormone, also known as gonadotropin, is a hormone that has an anabolic effect. Athletes take it to improve muscle mass and performance. However, it hasn't been shown conclusively to improve either strength or endurance. It is available only by prescription and is administered by injection. Erythropoietin is a type of hormone used to treat anemia in people with severe kidney disease.

    It increases production of red blood cells and hemoglobin, resulting in improved movement of oxygen to the muscles. Epoetin, a synthetic form of erythropoietin, is commonly used by endurance athletes.

    Erythropoietin use among competitive cyclists was common in the s and allegedly contributed to at least 18 deaths. Inappropriate use of erythropoietin may increase the risk of thrombotic events, such as stroke, heart attack and pulmonary embolism.

    Diuretics are drugs that change your body's natural balance of fluids and salts electrolytes and can lead to dehydration. This loss of water can decrease an athlete's weight, helping him or her to compete in a lighter weight class, which many athletes prefer. Diuretics may also help athletes pass drug tests by diluting their urine and are sometimes referred to as a "masking" agent. Diuretics taken at any dose, even medically recommended doses, predispose athletes to adverse effects such as:.

    Many athletes take nutritional supplements instead of or in addition to performance-enhancing drugs. Supplements are available over-the-counter as powders or pills. The most popular supplement among athletes is probably creatine monohydrate. Creatine is a naturally occurring compound produced by your body that helps your muscles release energy. Scientific research indicates that creatine may have some athletic benefit by producing small gains in short-term bursts of power.

    Creatine appears to help muscles make more adenosine triphosphate ATP , which stores and transports energy in cells, and is used for quick bursts of activity, such as weightlifting or sprinting.

    There's no evidence, however, that creatine enhances performance in aerobic or endurance sports. Your liver produces about 0. You also get creatine from the meat in your diet. Creatine is stored in your muscles, and levels are relatively easily maintained.

    Because your kidneys remove excess creatine, the value of supplements to someone who already has adequate muscle creatine content is questionable. Supplements are considered food and not drugs by the FDA. This means supplement manufacturers are not required to conform to the same standards as drug manufacturers do. In some cases, supplements have been found to be contaminated with other substances, which may inadvertently lead to a positive test for performance-enhancing drugs.

    Weight gain is sought after by athletes who want to increase their size. But with prolonged creatine use, weight gain is more likely the result of water retention than an increase in muscle mass. Water is drawn into your muscle tissue, away from other parts of your body.

    This puts you at risk of dehydration. It appears safe for adults to use creatine at the doses recommended by manufacturers. But there are no studies investigating the long-term benefits and risks of creatine supplementation. Some athletes use stimulants to stimulate the central nervous system and increase heart rate and blood pressure. Common stimulants include caffeine and amphetamines. Cold remedies often contain the stimulants ephedrine or pseudoephedrine hydrochloride.

    Energy drinks, which are popular among many athletes, often contain high doses of caffeine and other stimulants. The street drugs cocaine and methamphetamine also are stimulants. Although stimulants can boost physical performance and promote aggressiveness on the field, they have side effects that can impair athletic performance.

    Do performance-enhancing drugs boost performance? Some athletes may appear to achieve physical gains from such drugs, but at what cost? The long-term effects of performance-enhancing drugs haven't been rigorously studied. And short-term benefits are tempered by many risks. Not to mention that doping is prohibited by most sports organizations. No matter how you look at it, using performance-enhancing drugs is risky business.

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    This content does not have an Arabic version. Free E-newsletter Subscribe to Housecall Our general interest e-newsletter keeps you up to date on a wide variety of health topics. Know the risks Are you hoping to gain a competitive edge by taking muscle-building supplements or other performance-enhancing drugs?

    By Mayo Clinic Staff. Use of androgens and other hormones by athletes. Hatton CK, et al. Joseph JF, et al. Synthetic androgens as designer supplements. Reardon CL, et al. Drug abuse in athletes. Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation.

    Performance-enhancing drugs and the high school athlete. Drug testing in sport:

    Performance-enhancing drugs: Know the risks - Mayo Clinic

    effect of anabolic steroids on muscles

    Steroids And Their Harmful Side Effects | Muscle & Strength

    effect of anabolic steroids on muscles

    Anabolic steroids: Use, side effects, and risks

    effect of anabolic steroids on muscles